What happens when conversations around Mental Health meet Museums?

Different museums are joining the conversation about mental health in their own ways. Here is a Twitter round up on #WorldMentalHealthDay

MENTAL WELLBEING AT THE WORKSPACE

@Museum_Cardiff shining the torch on self care by highlight the importance of wellbeing in the workplace via music choir sessions.

The Hull Museum staff is investing their time in guided meditation, colouring, chatting over coffee and cake to highlight the point that a happy and stress free mindset is imperative to truly realizing inner potential.

MINDFULNESS FESTIVAL & COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION

The Leeds Museums & Galleries are running the Mindfulness Festival and asking the community to join in activities such as walking, meditation and coloring.

AUTHENTIC COMMUNICATION

Van Gogh Museum taking the route of authentic communication to highlight how Vincent van Gogh dealt with his mental illness?

It is using actual recorded narratives such as letters etc. to enhance the authentic tonality of the communication

BEARING WITNESS

At the Wakefield Museums the twitter posts appear to bear witness to what had actually happened rather than adding additional commentary. It gives the reader the necessary breathing space to make their own conclusions.

COASTER SOLIDARITY

The @UniMuseumScot shows solidarity and support with those who need access to help by providing relevant information about helplines etc.

WALK YOUR WAY TO WELLBEING

The folks at Horniman museum are taking a more practical approach to dialing up wellbeing and overall health. They are advocating a bit of physical movement via walking with the support of the #walkingguide to the Horniman.

GET CLOSE TO NATURE

Natural History Museum is asking you to get up and get close to nature to discover the incredible benefits nature has on mental and physical well being.

Finally last but not the least Freud Museum London underlines the pressure of obligations, losing social standing and reminds us that everyone has a role to play in providing support to those who need help at a time they may be feeling vulnerable.

Have you seen other examples of museums talking about mental health?Send them our way via the comments box.

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